Blended learning course II week 1

The “Blended Learning Essentials: Embedding Practice” MOOC started. I have attended the “Blended Learning Essentials: Getting Started” course last year. It really helped me to understand what is blended learning approaches, why it is useful in teaching, and how we can design blended courses. So I’m grateful for the opportunity to learn the topic further. It’s a good way for me to keep my knowledge up-to-date and learn from others.

In this week, it focuses on “how to make sure that when we use blended learning, we do achieve our aim of improving learner success“.

I particularly like the way of explaining to us how we can ‘identifying evidence of learning’ through the case study from an Aromatherapy course in Section 1.5. In this example, the different types of learning in action include below, which are useful for us to conduct a learning design in the later sections.

  • Acquisition (reading, watching, listening)
  • Discussion (exchanging ideas, Q&A with each other or with the teacher)
  • Practice (putting concepts, ideas, into practice in an exercise, with feedback)
  • Production (producing something for the teacher to assess).

The document “Learning types and digital technologies” demonstrates how we identify learning types, what learning activities are included a learning type, what learning experience the learning activity brings, and what conventional technology and digital technology support the learning activities.

The discussions about Learning Analytics have made me think more of the increasing use of data to support students’ learning, its challenges and issues. Among the learning materials, I feel the two articles “Learning analytics in secondary schools” (written by Tim Gander) and “Ten tips for safe and effective learning analytics” (written by Niall Sclater) helped me the most. As we have increasing amount of requirements for statistic reports of students online actions, it is crucial that we know why we use learning analytics and we provide complete transparency and clear institutional policies.

… to raise and benefit success of learners a policy framework must be established that supports the use of learning analytics, as opposed to academic analytics. The use must be driven by pedagogy rather than institutions. (Tim Gander, 2013)

Students should normally be asked for their consent for personal interventions arising from your analytics, either during enrolment or subsequently. But sometimes legal, safeguarding or other circumstances may arise that mean they can’t opt out of such interventions; if so, these circumstances must be clearly stated and explained.  (Niall Sclater, 2015)

It’s great to know that the UCL Knowledge Lab has developed a Learning Designer Tool based on the six learning types from professor Diana Laurillard’s Conversational Framework. The tool is useful for quick developing a learning design, visualising, editing, sharing and reusing it. I have created one from stretch using the tool, and I’m looking forward to exploring it more.

I also enjoy reading other people’s comments and learned learning martial and technologies:

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Digital accessibility course – week 4

This week is about making web content accessible.

Although I am familiar with HTML in my work, I have to check my knowledge again by reviewing the Web Content Accessibility Guideline (WCAG2.0) and the Web Accessibility Tutorials. I am glad to read the difference between WCAG1.0 and WCAG2.0 too. I realised that I still make mistakes when using “alt” to describe image.

The WCAG2.0 provides 12 guidelines and 4 principles for creating accessible web content. As more and more multimedia resources added into our e-learning system, I noticed the guideline 1.2 “Time-based Media: Provide alternatives for time-based media”. It’s very useful and can help us to reduce accessible barriers when creating the online resources.

With WAI-ARIA, developers can make advanced web applications accessible and usable to people with disabilities. Reading the Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines (ATAG), I started to think if Xerte Online Toolkit (1) has made the authoring tool itself accessible, and (2) helps authors produce accessible content.

There are 3 levels of conformance:

  • Level A (lowest): It is the minimum level of conformance, which means the web page satisfies all the Level A Success Criteria, or a conforming alternate version is provided.
  • Level AA: The Web page satisfies all the Level A and Level AA Success Criteria, or a Level AA conforming alternate version is provided.
  • Level AAA (highest): The Web page satisfies all the Level A, Level AA and Level AAA Success Criteria, or a Level AAA conforming alternate version is provided.

The important thing to know is that WCAG2.0 does not cover all accessibility problems, therefore conducting conformance checking of WCAG2.0 does not prove your website support accessibility to everyone.

The best way of testing a website accessibility is to combine the conformance testing and user testing as both ways have pros and cons.

Conformance testing includes two types testing below. However, it does not involve real users, but user testing may be time consuming, expensive and having difficulties to find suitable real users.

  • automatic testing, which is using programming to test. You can use WAVE and AChecker.
  • manual testing, which is experts inspection.

Through an example of improvement of a web site by applying the WCAG 2.0, I see the differences between applying WCAG2.0 and not applying it. It’s a good way to make us think about the online resources that we have developed, and what we can do.

Similar to previous weeks, I learnt some useful resources:

Test broadband

I applied a new broadband recently. So become curious about bandwidth and its connect quality.

Here a list of tools that help me to check my broadband.

  • Broadband speed tester on the LandlinesSaver website – tells the upload speed and download speed of your broadband according to your own use such as gaming, photos, film watching.
  • Broadband speed test on the moneysupermarket website – tells your download speed,upload speed and other broadband deals in your area.
  • Broadband speed test on the redcomdu website – tells your IP, download speed and upload speed. It describes broadband details and compares other broadband deals in your area.
  • Broadband speed test on the Uswitch website – tells your IP, download speed and upload speed. It provides top 10 broadband deals in your area.

Text 2.0 project

Using an eye tracker, we know the reading progress across a page, is it a cool idea? Text 2.0 project creates a eye tracking apps using HTML, CSS and JavaScript, as well as some diagnosis and related tools. It was developed by Ralf Biedert from the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence.

My interest is that how precise it is? I think the technology will be useful for a lecturer to deliver a big lecture, for people to follow a presentation in a conference, or for teachers to see how students read and learn.

The eWorld 2011 Awards

The eWorld 2011 Awards have been instituted with the primary aim of felicitating and acknowledging unique and innovative initiatives in the use of Information and Communication Technology for Development (ICT4D). These awards would be instrumental in promoting the most innovative initiatives in the domain of ICT4D and to spread awareness about the role of ICT in addressing social concerns in the domain of governance and health.

Date: 1st – 3rd August 2011

Venue: New Delhi, India