Blended learning course III week 2

To complete the week 2 was not as smooth as I expected because of some other unpredictable work. I went through each section and felt this course does not have as many comments from participants as the other two Blended learning courses. However, this doesn’t mean the course content is not well-organised. I am very grateful for the module providers and educators.

The key points of this week are digital content creation and collaboration in relation to the Digital Skills Framework.

We create/use digital content almost every day. It can be simple or sophisticated. I summarise a list of common skills and knowledge as follows.

Digital Content Creation Skills Knowledge on using technologies Tools / Technologies
Create/edit/publish/share images
  • image file types (e.g., .png, .jpeg, .exif, .gif, .svg, .bmp)
  • editing
  • convert file types
  • backup
  • embed html code elements
Create/edit/publish/share podcasts
  • audio file types (e.g., .wav, .wma, .mp3, .rm)
  • recording
  • editing
  • convert file types
  • backup
  • embed html code elements
Create/edit/publish/share videos
  • video file types (e.g., .mp4, .flv, .avi, wmv, .mov)
  • recording
  • editing
  • captioning
  • convert file types
  • backup
  • streaming
  • embed html code elements
Create/edit/publish/share websites
  • webpage files
  • RSS
  • CSS
  • HTML(5)
  • XML
  • Web domain
  • URL
  • web browser
Create/edit/publish/share objects
  • presentation
  • animation
  • multimedia files
  • web design
Create/edit/publish/share documents
  • file types (e.g., .doc, .odt, .rtf, .pdf, .txt, .xls, .csv, .wps)
  • backup
Create/edit/manage databases/content management systems

We share digital content with others frequently. We can reuse numerous online digital content created by others too (see free digital resources below). Copyright of digital content is the crucial knowledge. It is vital for we to understand what is free licensed online content and how we use Creative Commons.

We use collaboration technologies widely too. It can be a group of people work on organise socialised activities, distant learners take a group work, researchers from different institutions co-write a book, or people undertake a project together. Many useful tools have been introduced in the course. Here I list a few.

  • web conferencing and meeting tools (e.g., Adobe Connect, Webex and GotoMeeting, Skype, Google HangoutsGoogle Hangouts, WhatsApp, FaceTime) You can communicate online either one-to-one or in a group.
  • Twitter hashtags (A way of organising a discussion around topic and allowing people to easily follow through twitter.)
  • Diigo (A multi-tool for personal knowledge management. It supports many features such as bookmarking websites, tagging, creating your own library of online resources, highlighting text on web pages, and adding notes to web pages.)
  • OneFile (An e-portfolio tool that records and manages work-based training.)
  • Mahara (An open source ePortfolio and social networking web application.)
  • PebblePad (An ePortfolio and personal learning platform, where learners can manage their own learning materials in the way suits their learning purposes.)
  • Slack (A Teamwork tool that supports messaging, files management and sharing, video communications and more.)
  • Trello (A project management tool that can be used as a personal to-do list, or as a collaborative online tool for sharing and planning how a group of people work together.)

For me, there are many good tools, but the key is not the tool itself as it always changes and develops according to people’s needs. We cannot use one technology to help learners achieve the expected learning outcomes. It’s necessary to trail different ways of using technologies and find the most useful features that the technology can support for the learning activity.

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Blended learning course II week 3

This week we focused on how we apply blended learning in a realistic and sustainable way. From my perspective, leaders, champions, students and practitioners working together to shape the change is very important. The activities of this week aim to encourage us to reflect on and discuss three areas.

  • Matching your innovation to your organisation’s ambitions
  • Making blended learning affordable
  • Managing a change to a blended learning culture

The most useful learning for me is to consider the costs and benefits of blended learning. The critical questions are:

  • Can we improve outcomes without increasing the per-student workload for teachers?
  • Can we maintain or improve outcomes for a larger cohort, or a more diverse cohort?

For me, this is case by case. Improving outcomes may not mean increasing the pre-student workload for teachers, but could mean both teachers and students will have different experience from their previous ways, which may be adapted by some learner/teachers quickly comparing to others.

I am glad to know that University of London has developed a free tool “CRAM” to help educators analyse the teaching costs and learning benefits of moving teaching online. CRAM stands for Course Resource Appraisal Model. Below is an introduction presented by Dr Eileen Kennedy. It looks like a very useful tool, however I haven’t been able to try this tool yet due to technical problems.

The second useful learning is about “culture change”. The educators listed the important aspects of managing culture change. I think in my institution people are trying to improve each aspect regarding to their own remit, however they are not working together collaboratively enough to make the process efficient.

  • Leadership – leading by example, directly supporting culture change
  • Vision and strategy – demonstrating the reasons for change
  • Developing staff buy-in – overcoming barriers with individuals, demonstrating the value of technology
  • Using champions – sharing good practice between colleagues and teams to encourage positive change
  • Reward and recognition for staff – showcasing good practice, rewarding innovation and risk-taking
  • Working with students and other stakeholders – asking students, employers and professional bodies what they want, and involving them in change
  • Using evidence to support change – making sure that pedagogy drives the use of technology, not the other way round
  • Providing a supportive environment – encouraging a safe environment for colleagues to experiment, ask questions, develop confidence
  • Developing skills – providing opportunities for professional development
  • Providing a robust technology landscape – ensuring the infrastructure is robust, fit for purpose and easy to use.

In addition, reading, responding , and participating the comments are essential in online learning. It’s a good way of sharing, learning from others and getting peer review. To some extent, it encouraged me reflect more on my practice. Definitely I feel thankful for the opportunities to learn Blended Learning.

There is an upcoming course Blending Learning Essentials: Developing Digital Skills, which is one of the three Blended Learning courses run by the University of Leeds and the University College London. Although they are facing the VET sectors, I encourage HE academic staff and teaching/learning support staff to join.

More useful resources:

 

Blended learning course II week 2

It is a reflective thinking week for me. The course focused on blended learning innovation and how technology can help for the challenges the VET (Vocational Education and Training) sector are facing.

First, reaching more learners, more flexibly. Without learning the course content, I would say to make learning materials easy-to-accessible and widen the distribution channels are key to reach more learners. Through the course, I realised that developing collaborative learning will improve learning opportunities. Learners can take the task on their pace (synchronously or asynchronously). The teachers can reuse the learning designs and reduce their time on creating learning materials from scratch each time. The UCL Moodle Hub is a good example that shows how Moodle course design looks like, and how learning designs are shared and available for wider audience/teachers.

Second, developing independent learners. Many possible ways here such as peer review that is well facilitated by teachers, reflective learning activities and collaborative learning activities, and flipped learning activities. A combination of these ways will offer students different learning experience. Technology plays a valuable role in fostering independent learning and making teacher’s time more productive. For example, we can use the Learning Designer Tool to modify designs, share design ideas and reuse good designs. Students are able to access learning materials pre-/post- classes and learn at their own pace. To achieve this, it’s necessary that teachers know the best practice of using the VLE systems, the IT services make sure the technology works and fits the teacher’s purposes. The learning design needs to facilitate independent learning activities.

Third, reducing the costs of innovation. Encouraging people to share their learning designs, materials and good practices is important here. Cross-institutional collaboration is increasing gradually. I don’t have many evidence for its benefits. However, my experience with the JISC projects/programmes (cross-institutional collaboration) is positive. For example JISC Digital Literacy development programme and Jisc Digital Student. My perspective is that we need to work on how we can change institutional cultural and adaptiveness, and how we encourage people do so before OER policies are ready in the institution.

My another take-home tip is from the case analysis of “Prospect Training“. To take account of two important barriers to learner use:

  • (a) they made it downloadable, so it could be used on-site in any location, not being reliant on the internet, and
  • (b) they made it device independent, so that it works on any mobile device

More resources:

  • Good Things Foundation is a social change charity that supports socially excluded people to improve their lives through digital.
  • OER Commons is a digital public library and collaboration platform that aims to make high-quality education accessible, and to grow a sustainable culture of sharing and continuous improvement among educators at all levels.
  • Kahoot is a free game-based learning platform that makes it fun to learn – any subject, in any language, on any device, for all ages.
  • Explain Everything is an interactive whiteboard app that allows users to annotate, animate, narrate, import, and export almost anything to and from almost anywhere. An infinite collaborative space.

Blended learning course II week 1

The “Blended Learning Essentials: Embedding Practice” MOOC started. I have attended the “Blended Learning Essentials: Getting Started” course last year. It really helped me to understand what is blended learning approaches, why it is useful in teaching, and how we can design blended courses. So I’m grateful for the opportunity to learn the topic further. It’s a good way for me to keep my knowledge up-to-date and learn from others.

In this week, it focuses on “how to make sure that when we use blended learning, we do achieve our aim of improving learner success“.

I particularly like the way of explaining to us how we can ‘identifying evidence of learning’ through the case study from an Aromatherapy course in Section 1.5. In this example, the different types of learning in action include below, which are useful for us to conduct a learning design in the later sections.

  • Acquisition (reading, watching, listening)
  • Discussion (exchanging ideas, Q&A with each other or with the teacher)
  • Practice (putting concepts, ideas, into practice in an exercise, with feedback)
  • Production (producing something for the teacher to assess).

The document “Learning types and digital technologies” demonstrates how we identify learning types, what learning activities are included a learning type, what learning experience the learning activity brings, and what conventional technology and digital technology support the learning activities.

The discussions about Learning Analytics have made me think more of the increasing use of data to support students’ learning, its challenges and issues. Among the learning materials, I feel the two articles “Learning analytics in secondary schools” (written by Tim Gander) and “Ten tips for safe and effective learning analytics” (written by Niall Sclater) helped me the most. As we have increasing amount of requirements for statistic reports of students online actions, it is crucial that we know why we use learning analytics and we provide complete transparency and clear institutional policies.

… to raise and benefit success of learners a policy framework must be established that supports the use of learning analytics, as opposed to academic analytics. The use must be driven by pedagogy rather than institutions. (Tim Gander, 2013)

Students should normally be asked for their consent for personal interventions arising from your analytics, either during enrolment or subsequently. But sometimes legal, safeguarding or other circumstances may arise that mean they can’t opt out of such interventions; if so, these circumstances must be clearly stated and explained.  (Niall Sclater, 2015)

It’s great to know that the UCL Knowledge Lab has developed a Learning Designer Tool based on the six learning types from professor Diana Laurillard’s Conversational Framework. The tool is useful for quick developing a learning design, visualising, editing, sharing and reusing it. I have created one from stretch using the tool, and I’m looking forward to exploring it more.

I also enjoy reading other people’s comments and learned learning martial and technologies:

Inclusive learning and teaching environments course – week 3

This is the last week of the course. It focuses on how we can use technology to encourage collaboration in a range of learning situations and the emergence of the ‘technology power user’. Again an amount of learning materials are covered. I’d like to summarise it into five aspects.

First, preparing to support online learning inclusively. Aiming to ensure that the education is as inclusive as possible for disabled students.

JISC has provided guides to supporting online learning. It is imported to make online students feel they are connected with the institution.

Well-designed course activities can make them feel involved, but it’s useful to provide additional online social spaces, such as dedicated discussion forums or regular live chat sessions, to encourage interaction. This also provides an opportunity for students to feed back about the course and their learning experience.

Provide accessible support materials. For example the “Essential Digital Skills and Awareness” resources on the Southampton Solent University website.

The Journal of Inclusive Practice in further and higher education, Issue 5.1 Special Edition (2013) included ten research articles about the disability services in educational institutions.

The SCOPE website lists information of assistive technology and services for disabled people.

Second, considering accessibility when using social media, multimedia, mobile, mind mapping, and cloud technologies. Social media technologies allow people to connect and share information easier. Multimedia technologies allow people to interact with learning materials through multiple ways. Mobile technologies increase the flexibility of reaching online resources without location limits. Cloud technologies make backup, recovery and store documents easier. Mind mapping technologies provide another way for people to present their learning outcomes.

It is necessary to mention the JISC Digital Student Project again. Ray’s story shows how social media technologies can help his learning.

Many universities started to adopt social media and media technologies in teaching. For example, Queen’s University provides Social media accessibility of Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

Apple, Windows, and Android mobile phone system providers all published accessibility support guides.

Inclusive design is an important part of accessibility and usability. The University of Cambridge developed an Inclusive Design Toolkit which has helped me to understand the terms of ‘Design for all‘, ‘Universal design‘ and ‘inclusive design‘.

Third, considering accessibility in assessment. Thinking about offering different assessment modes and different choices within tasks to allow students to show their learning outcomes. JISC’s Making Assessments Accessible is the handy guide to get started.

Creating accessible examinations and assessments for disabled students article provides some useful suggestion for inclusive assessment. It is from the SHEFC-funded Project – Teachability: Creating an accessible curriculum for students with disabilities.

Plymouth University students and academics talked about their experiences of inclusive assessment and gave their advice on best practice.

A short video created by the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) introduces the way of designing assessment.

Inclusive teaching resources: Offer Flexible Assessment and Delivery generated by RMIT University is a useful guide for people to design, deliver and assess learning inclusively.

Introduction to Accessible Standardized Testing aims to provide design guidelines for building accessible standardized testing tools for Open Education Resource (OER) authors. It is from the Floe Inclusive Learning Design Handbook, which is a part of the Floe Project produced by the Inclusive Design Research Centre at OCAD University.

Fourth, thinking about “digital wellbeing“. Digital wellbeing is defined by JISC as follows. It brings the concerns such as workload, lack of time to explore digital approaches, stress and information overload, the responsibility staff take for the wellbeing of students, cyberbullying, and managing time.

The capacity to look after personal health, safety, relationships and work-life balance in digital settings.

Fifth, what can I do in my practice? I think it’s important to be aware of the inclusive teaching and learning as the first step. When I create new materials, bearing in mind the “born accessible” is the key. Talking to people about the inclusive teaching and learning when I support them is a slow but necessary way to make it happen.

More useful resources and tools:

Important developments in technology for Higher Education from 2017 to 2021

A diagram to summarise the important developments in technology for Higher Education

Inclusive learning and teaching environments course – week 2

This week, we had overwhelming information on the topic – how we can develop inclusive learning and teaching environments.

First, we need university-wide strategies and disability policies that help staff to understand the Equality Act 2010 or relevant Disability Act requirements and guide staff to realise and change mechanisms to support disabled students. These are two examples of Cornell University and University of Plymouth which show how they have suggested staff to foster inclusive teaching and learning environments. I think the checklist for inclusive teaching (from University of Playmouth) is particularly useful. It should be a part of the baseline (or sometimes called minimum standards) for VLE and relevant learning technologies in supporting online activities. It should guide not only the academic staff but also all support/professional staff.

Second, can technology helps? Yes, but we need to know limits of a technology, policies supporting disabled students, and teaching approaches. For example, the following statement is on a list of suggested good practice of communication in an inclusive way. It shows technology is not the first solution, we need to change our approaches before use a technology.

Notes or slides uploaded to a content management system or virtual learning environment 48 hours before the event.” (section 2.2)

Then we discussed the use of technologies such as lecture capture, presentations, note taking, TTSe-books, e-journals and students support.

So how about supporting students in different subjects such as STEM, Arts or Architecture? Think about the learners who are with mobility limits, hearing impairment, colour-blinded, or dyslexia, how assistive technology can support them in undertaking reading, assignment, writing, typing, or presenting? Through a few real learner cases, we discussed what should improve, what technologies can be used and what resource formats creators need to generate. My immediate taking includes:

Timely, the latest Inclusive Teaching and Learning in Higher Education as a route to Excellence guide identified 5 risks of adopting a strategic approach to reasonable
adjustments and what possible mitigating actions the HEP can take
.

Resources for us to understand inclusive teaching and learning:

Tools for supporting inclusive teaching and learning:

 

Blended Learning Course week 5

The last week of the course is about wider issues around blended learning: digital skills, inclusiveness, and flexibility. I didn’t expect that it is short and pass quickly.

I wasn’t aware of the Agored Cymru’s Essential Skills Wales provides standards for employment in today’s workplace. It includes essential skills for learners (Level 1-3 – Application of Number, Communication, Digital literacy, Employability, Skills for work and life) and essential skills for practitioners (Level 3 – Digital literacy, Employability, ESOL, Literacy, and Numeracy; Level 2 – Supporting Adults and Young People in Essential Skills). The resource I refer to the most is the JISC Digital Student project of exploring students’ expectations and experiences of using technology. I have learnt what I have done, I could do, and can do for students’ experience in my work through viewing the students’ stories.

I haven’t tried the Open University Being digital Self-assessment pathway, but it looks like a well-designed group of activities for helping learners to assess their digital skills and check if their online learning is effective.

The most impressive statements for me are below. It’s not very new, but it’s very useful to see the research evidences.

Learners’ digital experiences are strongly dependent on the confidence and capabilities of their teachers, but currently staff workload and career pathways are hindering staff development. (Digital Student: Further Education: FE learners’ expectations and experiences
of technology – Synthesis report
)

We must be careful that the educator’s ‘flexibility of time’ is not taken to mean ‘elasticity of time’. This is an absolutely critical issue for the successful introduction of blended learning. The effects on teacher workload are typically ignored in education strategy and policy documents, in the false assumption that going online is cheaper. It can be, but only if it is managed in a long-term and innovative way, which it rarely is. (section 5.5)

The JISC guide to using the assistive and accessible technology in teaching and learning is a handy resource for us to support inclusive teaching.

The Technology Outlook: Community, Technical, and Junior Colleges 2013-2018 is an US project report. It listed top ten trends impacting technology decisions and top ten most significant challenges. In this week I also attended an Educause webinar which shows the technology shifting to meet students’ learning requirements. It is worth reading the analysis. I jot down the impressive statements for me from the two reports as follows.

People expect to be able to work, learn, and study whenever and wherever they want. (p.17)

Education paradigms are shifting to include online learning, hybrid learning, and collaborative models. (p.17)

The workforce demands skills from university graduates that are more often acquired from informal learning experiences than in universities. (p.18)

The demand for personalized learning is not adequately supported by current technology or practices. (p.19)

Too often it is education’s own processes and practices that limit broader uptake of new technologies. (p.19)

The empirical evidence strongly suggests that blended learning conditions (where at least a quarter of course content is delivered online) produce significant gains in student learning. (section 4)

In addition, I have to thank Professor Neil Morris and Professor Diana Laurillard make the course interesting and easy to follow, share good practice tips, and open learning materials to wider audience. Many useful materials about blended learning are available from the University of Leeds.

More resources and tools: