I don’t know too much about data visulisation. However, I like to see the data/information being presented by graphics as “each image tells a story”. Run a search and got some free tools for data visulisation. I may need to use them later.

  • Bime is an easy service to connect to and analyse data in samll business and departments in larger organisations. It allows you to analyse your data through interactive data visualisations and reporting. It provides a 10-day free trial.
  • DataMasher helps citizens have a little fun with government and other public data by creating mashups to see how states compare on important issues.
  • Gapminder Desktop lets you explore the world from your own computer, even when you have no Internet.
  • The Google Public Data Explorer makes large datasets easy to explore, visualize and communicate.
  • Information Aesthetics is designed and maintained by Andrew Vande Moere, an Associate Professor at K.U.Leuven university, Belgium. His research interests include data visualization and visual design, from traditional screen-based interfaces, over “media architecture”, to more explorative, artistic and wearable applications.
  • Microsot PivotViewer makes it easier to interact with massive amounts of data on the web in ways that are powerful, informative, and fun. By visualizing thousands of related items at once, users can see trends and patterns that would be hidden when looking at one item at a time.
  • Protovis is free and open-source, provided under the BSD License. It uses JavaScript and SVG for web-native visualizations; no plugin required (though you will need a modern web browser)! Although programming experience is helpful, Protovis is mostly declarative and designed to be learned by example.
  • Raphaël is a small JavaScript library that should simplify your work with vector graphics on the web. If you want to create your own specific chart or image crop and rotate widget, for example, you can achieve it simply and easily with this library.
  • Tableau Public is a free service that lets anyone publish interactive data to the web. Once on the web, anyone can interact with the data, download it, or create their own visualizations of it. No programming skills are required.
  • Tulip is an information visualization framework dedicated to the analysis and visualization of relational data. Tulip aims to provide the developer with a complete library, supporting the design of interactive information visualization applications for relational data that can be tailored to the problems he or she is addressing.

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